Traditional Finnish Log House Building Process

author Northmen   5 год. назад
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The Birth Of A Wooden House. Extended

We unexpectedly found missing footage of two more scenes from the building process - moss collection in the local swamp and finishing of the frame. So we decided to make another version - extended edition (2 mins longer) to add those scenes to the movie and share them with you all. This is a documentary movie uncovering the process of building a wooden house with mostly hand tools from (as much as possible) local natural materials starting from forest till the living space. "I built my house from trees that I felled in winter time (-20C) with an axe and two man crosscut saw in my own forest. I did it following the research of old carpenter's calendar that coniferous trees should be felled in January's first days when the new moon rises and the deciduous trees should be felled in the winter time during the old moon. In winter time trees are sleeping and the juice and moisture content is very low in them. As time passes timber felled in winter becomes light and strong. In the building process I used mostly traditional carpenters hand tools - axes, hand saws, timber framing chisels and slicks, old Stanley planes, augers, draw knives and mostly human energy. All the ground work for fundaments and the basement earth digging was done by hand with shovels. The foundation consists mostly of bigger and smaller rocks and boulders. Lime, sand and concrete mixture are using only in small amounts - to hold the boulders together. The visible part over the ground level - boulder mosaic has been masoned with hand split local granite. The House has been built based on the western part of Latvia - Kurland/Kurzeme (German influence) historical wooden architecture typical technique - Timber Frame construction with sliding log walls between the posts. House is two carpentry technique union - Timber Frame (that is typical in France, Germany, Great Britain, North America and other countries) and traditional Latvian log building technique, between the logs using moss from the local swamp. In the walls, timber frame and roof construction there I used only wood joints and wooden pegs to hold the main construction together - no nails, screws or steel plates. Walls are insulated with 250mm thick dry pine and larch shaving layer (leftover from the local cabinet makers workshop). Overall exterior wall thickness is 50cm. In the walls (except wind vapour breathable membrane over the roof) has not been used any plastic or modern synthetic materials. To preserve the wood from the spoiling, fame posts, sills, top beams and final cladding boards are treated with fire and pine tar mixed with Tung oil. This wood preservation technique was adapted from the Japanese traditional wood preservation technique Shou Sugi Ban (焼杉板). Exterior cladding boards recoating each 10-15 years with Tung oil and pine or birch tar mixture, the house can last more than 500 years. As an example is taken Norwegian stave churches that stands more than 500 years until nowadays. Roofing is three layer white oak shingles (each 10mm thick, 120mm wide and 720mm long) laid in two directional technique. Overall amount of shingles used is 15 000 pieces. Roof walls are insulated with ecological wood fibre wool and wood fibre panels. Over the wood fibre panels are plastered natural plaster - mixture of sand, clay powder, lime, linen fibre, salt, wheat flour. Overall thickness of the plaster is 20mm and over all amount of plaster used on the walls are 5000 kilos. It works also as thermal mass and improves energy performance. Exterior measurements of the house is 6.5 x 13 meters. Living space in both floors are 120sq/m. The house is being heated with clay plastered brick bread oven and smaller oven made of clay tiles in the kitchen. To heat up both floors of the house, when outside it is minus 10 degrees (Celsium) only small oven is heated once a day. When freeze gets below -15, -20 C, we heat up the bread oven. Once it is heated, because of it’s thermal mass of 5 tons, it keeps the warmth 2-3 days. To heat up all the house (120 sq/m) in the winter time we use not more than 4 m3 (1.1 cord) of dry firewood. This is 2nd winter we are living there and we still heat up the house with the leftovers of lumber from the building process. And it will be enough for 3 more years. I have fulfilled my vision to a build natural, ecological house with high thermal efficiency, low energy consumption, sustainable, using local materials such as - wood, stone, old and new clay bricks, moss, linen fibre, clay, water, lime, wheat flour, salt and wood shavings." Jacob, carpenter, craftsman and founder of Northmen ( ex John Neeman Tools). http://northmen.com https://www.facebook.com/northmenguild https://www.instagram.com/northmenguild

Discovery Dream Homes Log Assembly

Enjoy this short video of Discovery Dream Homes and their team constructing one of their log homes. For more information you can contact them at www.discoverydreamhomes.com and talk to one of their knowledgable staff members.

Alone in the Wilderness

www.DickProenneke.com - "Alone in the Wilderness" is the story of Dick Proenneke living in the Alaska wilderness. Dick filmed his adventures so he could show his relatives in the lower 48 states what life was like in Alaska, building his cabin, hunting for food and exploring the area. Bob Swerer has taken the best footage from Dick's films and he has created 3 videos about Dick, "Alone in the Wilderness", "Alaska, Silence and Solitude" and "The Frozen North". You can purchase all of them in DVD or VHS format from the www.DickProenneke.com website.

Building an Off Grid Cabin using Free Pallet Wood: A Wilderness Project

We built this small off grid log cabin using recycled pallet wood that we collected for free. The aim of the diy project was to try and save money by building a cabin in the forest on the cheap. Living off grid is something we have always admired, being able to forage and gather food from the land, much like the primitive hunter-gatherer did. This off the grid cabin, although small, is an ideal one-man bug out camp in a survival situation. Slowly, we are turning this off grid cabin in the forest into a wilderness homestead. So far, this tiny hobbit home has no electricity or solar power, but it does have a window, roof, front porch, folding table, raised bed, chair, bench, shelves, bookcase and a woodstove to keep the cabin warm during the cold winter months. To build the pallet wood cabin we have used a mixture of hand tools and power tools. We filmed and documented the building of this log cabin in a playlist on our channel called "The Off Grid Pallet Wood Cabin" which you can watch here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLxnadpeGdTxDMYqxhMnVMPHzgIuUOKB54 We started the cabin build by breaking the pallets down into useable pieces of timber. We then cleared a site in the forest to build the foundations of the cabin using larger pallets. The second stage of the build was the side walls, and then the roof, which we used a piece of recycled tin from an old barn. We then fitted a small window from a garden shed, and started to work on building the front porch. Once the main structure of the cabin was complete, we focused on making rustic pallet wood furniture for the inside of the small house. We bolted together a raised bed, and made a small chair and foldaway table to save space inside. We then needed to heat the cabin, for this we opted for the G Stove Heat View which has a stove pipe oven attachment so that we can bake food in it, plus a water container to boil water for fresh coffee and tea. In many of the episodes we cooked food in cast iron frying pans on the woodstove. In the warmer months we cooked on an open camp fire using a cast iron grill on a Bushcraft style tripod which we lashed together. We have cooked fresh fish, pie, bacon, eggs, soup and much more on the woodstove. Hopefully, we can use this former Bushcraft Camp as an area to practice developing our wilderness survival skills, learning primitive technology and how to forage for wild edibles and catch and cook our food. At the end of the day, this project was more about a father and son spending time in the outdoors working on free diy projects and learning how to become self reliant and save money for a happier lifestyle. We hope you enjoy the adventure! The Woodstove we use is the Gstove Heat View. They are offering my subscribers 15% off their stoves and accessories on their website: https://www.gstove.com/ It's an affiliate code so it helps out our Channel :) Follow me on Instagram for behind the scenes: https://www.instagram.com/taoutdoorofficial/ My Facebook Page for short videos and updates: https://www.facebook.com/totallyawesomeoutdoors If you wish to send me stuff: Mike Pullen PO Box 7466 HOOK RG27 7NA Subscribe to our other Fishing YouTube Channel "TAFishing" here: https://www.youtube.com/tafishing

Impossible Dovetail

I made an impossible looking dovetail joint using a 2 by 2 http://www.jax-design.net/ Check out my other solution, impossible dovetail "the right way" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xg1J3tdfUFY&list=TLULo5An2BGBU&index=3

Traditional Finnish Log House Building Process.

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